porn blogs are following me? why?

So after my camera was just laying round the place collecting dust, I finally used it. But of course I didn’t choose an easy project, I decided to tackle a nude shoot.  They can either come out tacky or downright cringe worthy if they’re not done well.  So of course there was a lot of pressure to do it right.  This is just a little taste of what I came up with.  I think the images came out well for my first time.  
I’m happy.
Pt. 2 So after my camera was just laying round the place collecting dust, I finally used it. But of course I didn’t choose an easy project, I decided to tackle a nude shoot.  They can either come out tacky or downright cringe worthy if they’re not done well.  So of course there was a lot of pressure to do it right.  This is just a little taste of what I came up with.  I think the images came out well for my first time.  
I’m happy.
Pt. 2

So after my camera was just laying round the place collecting dust, I finally used it. But of course I didn’t choose an easy project, I decided to tackle a nude shoot.  They can either come out tacky or downright cringe worthy if they’re not done well.  So of course there was a lot of pressure to do it right.  This is just a little taste of what I came up with.  I think the images came out well for my first time.  

I’m happy.

Pt. 2

So after my camera was just laying round the place collecting dust, I finally used it. But of course I didn’t choose an easy project, I decided to tackle a nude shoot.  They can either come out tacky or downright cringe worthy if they’re not done well.  So of course there was a lot of pressure to do it right.  This is just a little taste of what I came up with.  I think the images came out well for my first time.  
I’m happy.
Pt. 1 So after my camera was just laying round the place collecting dust, I finally used it. But of course I didn’t choose an easy project, I decided to tackle a nude shoot.  They can either come out tacky or downright cringe worthy if they’re not done well.  So of course there was a lot of pressure to do it right.  This is just a little taste of what I came up with.  I think the images came out well for my first time.  
I’m happy.
Pt. 1

So after my camera was just laying round the place collecting dust, I finally used it. But of course I didn’t choose an easy project, I decided to tackle a nude shoot.  They can either come out tacky or downright cringe worthy if they’re not done well.  So of course there was a lot of pressure to do it right.  This is just a little taste of what I came up with.  I think the images came out well for my first time.  

I’m happy.

Pt. 1

englishsnow:

 z a r i a n k a





englishsnow:

 z a r i a n k a





englishsnow:

 z a r i a n k a
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
neomexicanismos:

Arte urbano, México
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.
dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.
Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.
Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.
Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.

dynamicafrica:

Photographs by Malian vintage studio photographer Adama Kouyaté.

Although most of us are familiar with the names and iconic images of Seydou Keita and Malick Sidibe, one of my favourite vintage Malian photographers who emerged during the same period as his aforementioned counterparts is Adama Kouyaté.

Finding information on Kouyaté is a little more difficult that with Sidibe and Keita, but Kouyaté was born in 1928 in Bougani, Mali. In 1944, he relocated to Bamako in search of work and it was there, two years later, that he took up photography under the apprenticeship of Bakary Doumbia, a studio photographer. Shortly after, he opened his own photo studio in Kati, near Bamako. In the mid-1960s, Kouyaté left Mali for Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and ran a studio there for a short while before returning to Segou, Mali, in 1968, where he operated a photo studio photographing portraits, weddings and other special occasions.

Even at his old age, Kouyaté continues to take picture IDs in his studio on Elhaj Omar Tall Street in Ségou.

(via ladybelletrist)

englishsnow:

 Joel Schlichtemier





englishsnow:

 Joel Schlichtemier





englishsnow:

 Joel Schlichtemier





englishsnow:

 Joel Schlichtemier





englishsnow:

 Joel Schlichtemier
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 
artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 

artesany:

Diez Razones para visitar Campeche 

(via etta--bishop)

cross-connect:

Kåre Gade is a film photographer who sticks to the basics– no editing.
cross-connect:

Kåre Gade is a film photographer who sticks to the basics– no editing.
cross-connect:

Kåre Gade is a film photographer who sticks to the basics– no editing.

cross-connect:

Kåre Gade is a film photographer who sticks to the basics– no editing.

(via adragondoesnotfear)